An Autumn Tour of Japan – Day by Day In 17 Syllables

This autumn’s Japan Enchantment was certainly one that provided my group with natural enchantment. As a Tour Leader, I am often barking instructions, explanations, giving meeting times and imparting the nitty-gritty in order to get the job done. However, I  do still get the opportunity to step back and acknowledge life’s sublime moments, even at work. Haiku and photos should more than capture those moments, so here goes…

Day 1 TokyoTokyo scene

The Tangerine Dawn

Punctured by Tokyo’s Needle

Promise of color

Day 2 Nikko
Across the mountains

Clouds settle and rest

As dying flames lick rockface

Autumn Zen Landscapes

Day 3 Nikko

Waterfalls in Nikko

Majestic Kegon

Her Hair of Silken Water

Nikko’s Hyrdro Queen

Day 4 Karuizawa

Autumn leaves

Reflective Maples

Tearful ripples sketch the pond

Soon to fade away

Day 5 Karuizawa

Fallen

Wet Ancient Timepiece

Witness to history’s course

Records nature’s death

Day 6 Nagano

Snow monkey

The elderly Man

Life patterns scarred on calm face

We have felt his pain

Day 7 Kanazawa

Waiting for food

Beady eyed heron

Focus fixed in driving rain

Meal time swims closeby

Day 8 Kanazawa

Koyo colours

Lacquered Storehouse woos

Simplicity wrapped in gold

Nature Holds its own

Day 9 Kyoto

Fun with Geisha

Entrancing beauty

An autumn bird in full flight

The Maiko holds Court

Day 10 Kyoto

Sun and Gardens

The mountain beckons

Spirituality rays

Zen in the morning

 

Day 11 Kyoto

Reflecting 

Rain meets old bamboo

Sepia Kaleidoscope

A trick of nature

Day 12 Hakone

Fuji leaves

She teases keen eyes

Her leafy veil drip-blood red

Mt Fuji on fire

Day 13 Hakone

Natural sculptures

Sculpture meets nature

Spiritual awakening

Saturates the mind

Three Reasons To Choose a Small Group Tour

Getting into local life
As an independent traveller, I’ll admit I was slightly hesitant about joining a small group tour. I’ve been on tours before, but it wouldn’t normally be my number one choice to travel with a group. However, having joined InsideJapan’s Japan Unmasked tour for a few days, I can now see that there are massive benefits to joining a small group tour instead of going it alone.

1. Stress-free sightseeing
Your full-time Tour Leader will take all of the stress out of travelling around from place to place, and will be there to either show you the sights or point you in the right direction if you wish to do your own thing. You have the best of both worlds, in that there is an expert to deal with all the logistics of travel, and yet you have the freedom to do as you please and don’t have to be herded around in a massive group or squeezed uncomfortably onto a hot bus at any point during the trip. Yes, you can have your matcha roll cake and eat it too!

Our Tour Leader sharing some brief Japanese history with the group

Our Tour Leader sharing some brief Japanese history with the group

2. The Group
Travelling in a group of people you don’t know can be slightly intimidating at first, especially as a solo traveller. However, InsideJapan’s small group tours attract all different kinds of customers from all over the world, and joining a tour group is a great way to make new friends and share experiences. You all have Japan in common, and probably all have different reasons for wanting to visit Japan. For some it will be another country to tick off their list of places visited, and for others it will be a life-long dream come true to visit Japan because of a particular interest in some aspect of Japanese culture. Together you can share experiences and knowledge, and try new things!

Tour Group at Sensoji

Your Tour Leader might turn out to be something of a celebrity…

3. Getting beneath the surface
InsideJapan’s motto is ‘get beneath the surface’, and there’s no better way to do that than with an expert Tour Leader by your side. As someone who has travelled in Japan quite extensively I would consider myself something of an expert. However, after just one evening with our expert Tour Leader I realised there was still so much to learn! Whether it was finding new items on the menu in the izakaya, hearing a snippet of history for the first time, or simply visiting somewhere new, your Tour Leader will certainly help you to get the most out of your time in Japan!

Cultural experiences in an izakaya...

Cultural experiences in an izakaya…

Finally, if like me, you’re quite an independent traveller but like the idea of joining a small group tour, why not do both? No matter how much you fit in whilst you are on tour, you will always wish you had just a little more time in Tokyo or the chance to visit just one more destination, so why not add on a few extra nights of independent travel after your tour. By the time the tour finishes you’ll be something of an expert yourself, and ready to take on Tokyo alone (armed with your tailor-made Info-Pack of course!).

J-pop and Go!

We have a lot of very different tours and trips here at InsideJapan, taking in all kinds of interests and destinations. One of our most experience packed and certainly one of our most lively, is the J-pop&Go! Tour which was created in conjunction with HYPERJAPAN. The trip really does combine the modern wonders and the traditional culture of this unique country. Got to love Japan.

Here’s a little bit of video taken from on tour to give you a taster -

J-Pop and Going on a HYPERJAPAN Tour

Way of the Samurai(photos by Ken Francisco)

Our inaugural HYPERJAPAN J-Pop and Go! tour was a great reminder that even going back to places that I’ve visited a dozen or more times can bring unexpected experiences, new surprises and untold amounts of fun! Working with the folks at HYPERJAPAN, we created a tour for people with as much energy as a Japanese anime character. We trounced from Buddhist temple to maid cafe, from the insanity of the Robot Restaurant to the quietude of a traditional Japanese garden. We learned about geisha culture from one of the world’s foremost experts and we were taught Zen meditation from a Buddhist monk but we also dressed up in kimono for a samurai sword lesson and slept in a capsule hotel! Although you’ll read about the Japan as the land of contrasts in any and every guidebook, there has surely never been a tour where these contrasts are juxtaposed so vividly. If you’re interested in the full spectrum of Japanese culture, 10 days on this tour will have knowing more about Japanese pop culture than most people who stay for 6 months.

Men at work

KaraokeHiroshima Bay

Luckily I don’t need to ramble on about how good everything was because Kenneth Francisco – a skilled photographer and a passenger on the very first tour – has been kind enough to let us use his images for an exploratory journey through a few highlights of this great tour. Arigatou Ken!

MarioKiyomizu, Kyoto

Manga and Maids

At our visit to the maid cafe (pictured above) we sang songs, performed “magic” to enhance the deliciousness of our cute and cuddly meals and even had a birthday celebration for a very embarrassed young man! But in Kyoto we got to experience old Japan by visiting several UNESCO World Heritage Sites and rubbing elbows with many kimono clad locals. Walking through the romantic old buidlings in the geisha district on a quiet and warm spring night was the highlight for a couple who came on the tour for their honeymoon. For a few others, the maid cafe and capsule hotel came in with the top ranking!

Tour leader, Tyler

 

Romantic Dear

Life size anime

Miyajima Tori

In these shots Ken has caught me explaining sankinkotai with the picture of a samurai and also managed to find a couple of romantic deer whispering sweet nothings to one another on Miyajima island, the home of the massive floating Torii gate – although that only applies when the tide is in! But my personal favorite is Ken posing with Goku from Dragon Ball Z.

Osaka Castle

okonomiyakiCup noodles

We had great weather throughout this tour, as can be evidenced by the clear views from Osaka castle (above) and of Mt. Fuji (below). The shot on the left shows our okonomiyaki being grilled right in front of us in Hiroshima while the picture on the right is from the Ramen Museum in Osaka, where we got to design and make our very own Cup of Noodles to take home with us as a souvenir. I can’t speak for the rest of the group but mine were delicious! ;)

Fuji from Hakone

Sushiiii

Tsukiji fish market

Conveyor belt sushi in Kyoto is always a favorite on my tours but it couldn’t top the amazing stuff we had at the famous Tsukiji Fish Market in Tokyo! Our small group took up the entire restaurant.

Serious tour leader time

Karaoke tour leader time

Lets sing!

Bullet Train Bento

Showing my serious, and not-so-serious, sides above; no trip to Japan is completely without one crazy night of karaoke and a delicious bento box on the bullet train!

Deadly ladies

Samurai

I lost

Here we are learning the techniques of the samurai and looking very good in the process. These girls would give Uma Thurman a run for her money any day! Just ask Jeff, seen above before and after his bout with his spouse.

Capsule Hotel

 

Zen moments in Kyoto

Crazy Robot Restaurant, Toyko

And what better way to finish off than with pictures from three of my own personal favorite experiences from this great and varied tour. Here’s our capsule hotel, our Zen meditation session and the crazy but hilarious visit to the Robot Restaurant!

More HYPERJAPAN J-Pop & Go! to come….

 

 

Land of the Gods | Kamikochi Japan

The Historic Mountain Trail tour recently travelled through Kamikochi. Here’s tour leader David to tell us more…

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Nestled deep in the Alps, Kamikochi seems worlds away from the urban sprawl most people associate with Japan.  The air is fresh, the waters crystal clear, and the mountains majestic. The name can mean “high above earth” or “where the gods descended” and is apt both literally and figuratively.

2

Located a little less than two hours from either Matsumoto or Takayama (both worthy of a visit), makes it a comfortable escape and return to the wild. Due to the increasing popularity of the national park, private vehicles are no longer allowed inside the resort, meaning the only means of vehicular access is limited to either bus or sanctioned taxis. This is more of a blessing than an inconvenience for those basking in the peacefulness of what many refer to as their favorite place in Japan.

6

At the bus terminal, there is a tourist information center where visitors can purchase pocket-sized maps of the area for 100 yen.  There is also a rest area where you can plan your route while enjoying refreshments from one of the many nearby shops. Those who need a toilet are encouraged to show their appreciation for cleanliness by placing a tip in a box with a note stating the average amount is 100 yen. There are about seven other equally clean toilets scattered throughout the park that deny you this privilege, forcing the use of their facilities for free.

14

Walking towards the azure waters of the Azusa River, it’s easy to see Kappabashi (not to be confused with the popular “Kitchen Town” in Tokyo), the most famous bridge in the area, and a popular landmark where many visitors like to take pictures. The view from there of the nearby mountains towering above is, in a word, stunning. Both sides of the bridge offer a number of accommodation and refreshment options.

4

A relaxed half-hour walk downstream brings you to the Hotaka and Tashiro bridges, which are joined by a small island. Another twenty minutes or so from there, either by a river or forest path, brings you to Taisho Pond, which was formed when nearby Mount Yake, an active volcano, erupted in 1915. The ever-present smoke plume coming out the top can serve as a reminder to be respectful of nature, especially in its most pristine state. Speaking of which, visitors are expected to leave only footprints, bringing all trash home with them (most opt for a rubbish bin in the nearest major town, but some, like my roommate, actually do maintain an impressive alter to the god of refuse in their house).

3

Those who would rather not retrace their steps, and don’t mind paying four or five hundred yen, can catch a bus at the nearby Taisho Bus Stop bound for the terminal, where they can start again.

16

Myojinbashi is the next bridge upstream from Kappabashi, and can be reached in about an hour by either a boardwalk across marshes and streams on the north side of the river, or via a footpath through a campsite with toilets on the south side. Keep your eyes open for macaques. Nearby Myojin Pond (entry ¥300) is a must-see. There are rest areas either side of the bridge with toilets and refreshments available.

10

Another hour or so upstream, on the south side, is a grassy meadow dotted with elm trees. This used to be a pasture, but is now Tokusawa campsite. There are more lodging, toilet and refreshment opportunities here as well. For day-trippers, this would be a good place to turn around and head back to the bus terminal. Serious hikers staying in the area will want to continue on a few hours to the peaks.

8

There is plenty of gorgeous scenery to be enjoyed by all fitness levels, making Kamikochi a fantastic destination for all age groups. The usual outdoor common sense applies (stay on paths, don’t feed wildlings). Dressing in layers with waterproof gear is recommended as the weather can change from a warm sunny day to hail in a couple hours.

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More information can be found here: www.kamikochi.or.jp/english

Japan Spring Elegance in pictures

My two week Spring Elegance tour around Honshu Island leading, 14 eager travellers from Switzerland, Germany, Australia, the US, Poland, Ukraine and the UK coincided with the stunning cherry blossom season. Here are a few of my favourite snapshots of a rewarding fortnight on the road, showing great people this great country!!

 

Tokyo’s Skytree, 634m of steel, concrete and glass – a striking feature of the capital’s skyline from many a district. Undoubtedly not the most aesthetically pleasing of architectural creations, a little sakura framing, however, creates an image of harmony in this sea of 33 million people.

Tokyo’s Skytree, 634m of steel, concrete and glass – a striking feature of the capital’s skyline from many a district. Undoubtedly not the most aesthetically pleasing of architectural creations, a little sakura framing, however, creates an image of harmony in this sea of 33 million people.

 

Tokyo Japan

Ueno district – market madness, where pickled giant octopus tentacles are on offer next to discount watches, traditional green tea, fish flakes, funky footwear and multi-coloured golf balls. Galleries and museums, a favourite sprawling park with gorgeous summer lotus pond and even a zoo make this another hotspot on any Tokyo itinerary. Here, Ueno Station’s main concourse pays tribute to its 2 most esteemed residents – the cherry blossoms of Ueno Park and the pandas of Ueno Zoo.

Architecturally - the most perfect historic building in Japan? Matsumoto Castle in full spring elegance – a glorious symbol of this wonderful little city perched on the plains to the east of the Northern Japanese Alps.

Architecturally – the most perfect historic building in Japan. Matsumoto Castle in full spring elegance – a glorious symbol of this wonderful little city perched on the plains to the east of the Northern Japanese Alps.

Springtime is a popular time to have the wedding photos taken, even if the ceremony is a long way off. This charming young couple were off, with photographer and assistant in tow, to the castle grounds of Matsumoto for those once-in-a-lifetime romantic shots.

Springtime is a popular time to have the wedding photos taken, even if the ceremony is a long way off. This charming young couple were off, with photographer and assistant in tow, to the castle grounds of Matsumoto for those once-in-a-lifetime romantic shots.

One of the key 6 features of the Kenrokuen, arguably Japan's finest strolling garden, is the incorporation of water in its layout. The falling sakura petals often fall and are clustered on the surface of the shallow streams which serenely trickle their way beneath beautifully sculpted pines or amongst the lilies.

One of the key  features of Kanazawa’s Kenrokuen, arguably Japan’s finest strolling garden, is the incorporation of water in its layout. The sakura petals often fall and are clustered on the surface of the shallow streams which serenely trickle their way beneath beautifully sculpted pines or amongst the lilies.

Kanazawa, within the former samurai domain of Kaga, is rich in tea ceremony history, its patronage of Noh Theatre, local crafts and a wonderfully rich seafood cuisine. Here, some of our small group travellers sample the delights of Kaitenzushi – a conveyor belt sushi restaurant in Edo Period Omicho Market, ordering by touch panel menus!

Kanazawa, within the former samurai domain of Kaga, is rich in tea ceremony history, its patronage of Noh Theatre, local crafts and a wonderfully rich seafood cuisine. Here, some of our small group travellers sample the delights of Kaitenzushi – a conveyor belt sushi restaurant in Edo Period Omicho Market, ordering by touch panel menus!

A proud local inspects his district’s float during Takayama’s  Sanno Matsuri, held April 14th and 15th of every year to offer prayers for the rice cultivating season. The parading of these centuries-old floats, adorned with gold, the finest lacquer finish and exquisite woodcarvings, is a highlight of the festivities.

A proud local inspects his district’s float during Takayama’s Sanno Matsuri, held April 14th and 15th of every year to offer prayers for the rice cultivating season. The parading of these centuries-old floats, adorned with gold, the finest lacquer finish and exquisite woodcarvings, is a highlight of the festivities.

Who would think that just 10 minutes from the lively centre of Takayama, home to the fabulous Spring and Summer float festivals, you could find yourself in such gloriously secluded nature? This is my favourite, and certainly least expected shot of the trip. A quiet mid-morning walk on Shiroyama Hill.

Who would think that just 10 minutes from the lively centre of Takayama, home to the fabulous Spring and Summer float festivals, you could find yourself in such gloriously secluded nature? This is my favourite, and certainly least expected shot of the trip. A quiet mid-morning walk on Shiroyama Hill.

Personally, of all the places in Japan that I regularly visit with groups – the ever-popular Ginkaku-Ji Temple in Kyoto, with its (non) Silver Pavilion and mesmerizingly calming gardens is among Japan’s most beautiful places. Even if crowded, serenity pervades all – if it fails first time round, do a second lap of the gardens, as the friendly temple staff will eagerly encourage you. Wherever you turn  another glimpse of beauty awaits!

Personally, of all the places in Japan that I regularly visit with groups – the ever-popular Ginkaku-Ji Temple in Kyoto, with its (non) Silver Pavilion and mesmerizingly calming gardens is among Japan’s most beautiful places. Even if crowded, serenity pervades all – if it fails first time round, do a second lap of the gardens, as the friendly temple staff will eagerly encourage you. Wherever you turn another glimpse of beauty awaits!

Together alone at last – a couple enjoy the solitude of early morning Ginkakuji Temple. How did they make it across that sand without leaving footprints? A spiritual journey, deep into Zen, indeed!

Together alone at last – a couple enjoy the solitude of early morning Ginkakuji Temple. How did they make it across that sand without leaving footprints? A spiritual journey, deep into Zen, indeed!

Kyoto Japan

Two seafood-loving customers chomp on baby octopus stuffed with quail’s egg – on a stick. Snack hunting Kyoto style, in the intriguing Nishiki Food Market, where every shop and stall reveals a new Japanese culinary delight!

The unashamed western opulence of the Fujiya Hotel is beautifully enhanced by its Japanese garden – featuring waterwheel, lanterns, streams and cascades. The perfect start to a busy day in Hakone? Looking down over the garden to the borrowed scenery of Hakone’s verdant hills beyond (actually a crater rim!). Then onto a day of volcanic landscapes, azul Lake Ashi, ancient Samurai Highways and, fingers crossed, spectacular views of Mt Fuji, resplendent in her white veil of snow. No luck this time but as you can see, Hakone has so much natural splendour to offer!

The unashamed western opulence of the Fujiya Hotel is beautifully enhanced by its Japanese garden – featuring waterwheel, lanterns, streams and cascades. The perfect start to a busy day in Hakone? Looking down over the garden to the borrowed scenery of Hakone’s verdant hills beyond (actually a crater rim!). Then onto a day of volcanic landscapes, azul Lake Ashi, ancient Samurai Highways and, fingers crossed, spectacular views of Mt Fuji, resplendent in her white veil of snow. No luck this time but as you can see, Hakone has so much natural splendour to offer!

Staying at the Asakusa View Hotel is always a treat. East or West facing, you are always sure to enjoy a spectacular view from your bedroom window. As dusk draws in, the frenetic energy of this popular tourist area, renowned for the bustling Sensoji Temple and surrounding traditional shops and eateries, fades into the calming orange hue of Tokyo’s cityscape as it bows towards the setting sun.

Staying at the Asakusa View Hotel is always a treat. East or West facing, you are always sure to enjoy a spectacular view from your bedroom window. As dusk draws in, the frenetic energy of this popular tourist area, renowned for the bustling Sensoji Temple and surrounding traditional shops and eateries, fades into the calming orange hue of Tokyo’s cityscape as it bows towards the setting sun.

Tour of Tokyo

I was recently asked to take some travelers on manga and anime inspired journey around Tokyo. Yet, like any of the world’s truly great cities, Tokyo simply can’t be seen in a day or even a week. There are far too many out of the way neighborhoods, back-street cafes, mind-blowing museums and unadvertised izakayas even for those of us who call Tokyo home to see it all; I still stumble across new experiences on an almost daily basis! Nevertheless, I was determined to give these keen adventurers a sense of what this great city is all about and that is exactly what we did!

Our day started in the Asakusa district. Although it is more famous for its traditional side, the area’s modern architecture is always impressive.

Starting early, we went straight to Senso-ji Temple to learn a bit about Buddhism and gain a better understanding of how it has interacted with Japan’s native Shinto religion throughout the country’s long and fascinating history. The centerpiece of this complex is the towering building of the temple’s main hall, we wandered around in the shadow of Senso-ji’s graceful 5-story pagoda and envisioned old Japan. Something that is surprisingly easy to do even while in the very centre of modern Tokyo. Nearby, we explored manga cafes, pachinko parlors and traditional Japanese comedy before making our way to the Sumida River where we caught our futuristic water bus to Odaiba, a man-made island with an artificial beach that sits right in the centre of Tokyo Bay.

The Gundam Front museum in Odaiba is well worth a visit even if you’ve never heard of Gundam or have no interest in anime. This is the perfect introduction!

Disembarking at Odaiba’s Seaside Park you realize quickly that this is a very different side of Tokyo. Aside from the long sandy beach, Odaiba also offers sweeping views of the elegant Rainbow Bridge and Tokyo’s skyline across the bay. For us, it was directly to Gundam Front, a theatre and museum celebrating one of Japan’s most popular anime. Even if the massive replica of the fighting robot (Gundam) fails to impress you, rest assured that the domed theatre will give you a perfect introduction into the artisan that is Japanese animation.

Just down the road is the National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation; a fantastic museum that offers all the proof you could ask for that Japan is still as cutting edge as ever. Navigate your way through holograms of Japan’s seismic activity, see what happens to a Cup O’ Noodles container 6000 meters under the sea and watch the famous robot Asimov perform 3 times a day.

The National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation in Odaiba.

Getting close to lunch time but not quite ready for our meal with maids (more to come on that…) we sat down to a delicious snack of octopus balls. Note: ‘balls’ refers to the shape of snack and not part of the octopi’s anatomy!

Taking the zippy Yurikamome monorail line, we got some great views of the rainbow bridge and made quick time to the modern and prestigious Shiodome district. As soon as we got off the train we came face-to-face with the massive Ghibli steampunk clock, designed by the Walt Disney of Japan himself, Miyazaki Hayao!

After all this excitement and modernity, we were more than ready for a bit of relaxation so we stopped off for a little peak at the tea ceremony and a dose of tranquility in the exquisitely manicured Hamarikyu Gardens. These Japanese gardens date back to the days of the shogun and are carefully looked after by a small army of gardeners.

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After our well-deserved stop at the gardens, we left rested and ready for more. Making use of Tokyo’s fantastic trains, we went straight to that mecca of manga and anime… Akihabara! This district is full of electronics and video games and manga and anime and toy models and has served as the colorful backdrop to many a travel show. But we came for lunch at a maid cafe! To be sure, this experience can be a little surreal to say the least but it is also quintessentially Japanese and a lot of fun. Not only are your servers dressed in maid outfits, they also put on dance performances and go through hand motions that are meant to make your food more delicious… though the efficacy of this is probably better left untested.

Whether it’s a bright green melon soda that you’re after or merely a Japanese om-rice with a picture of a bunny drawn in ketchup on it, this is the place!

Image

After our late lunch, we wandered around Akihbara taking in cosplay outfits, video game karaoke boxes and teenagers dancers working themselves into a frenzy for a new high score before making our way to Shibuya and the world’s busiest pedestrian intercrossing.

ImageEvery 30 seconds, when the traffic signals turn red and the green man reappears another wave of human bodies seemingly come from thin air and invade the giant zebra crossing. Like a choreographed dance, they zoom across the just in time for the whole process to repeat itself again and again.

But Shibuya has far more than just a big pedestrian intercrossing. This district has great shopping, cool cafes and plenty of amazing restaurants. Even better, it is also only a short walk away from Harajuku and Tokyo’s Meiji Jingu Shinto Shrine.

Much like Hamarikyu Gardens, this shrine is a bastion of quietude set in the middle of one of Tokyo’s most ‘buzzing’ districts. It was the perfect place for a bit of reflection on Japanese society and a great opportunity to compare and contrast with the Buddhist temple that we started at this morning. Explaining the intricacies of these two religions is something that I have come to love because I feel like it helps people get a grasp on this wonderful country and all the great things that they will be seeing as they travel around.

The sake casks at the entrance to Meiji Shrine.

The sake casks at the entrance to Meiji Shrine.

The iconic Tokyo Tower at sunset.

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